• FloripaSat-I

    FloripaSat-I is our current mission and the first mission developed in its entirety by the group FloripaSat. Also it's the first CubeSat in Santa Catarina (Brazil) to develop all the circuit boards, from the layout and choosing of parts to the soldering of components.

    The FloripaSat-I consists of a 1 U cubesat (a cube of 10 cm) with seven boards stacked (OBDH, EPS, TTC, battery board, interface board and two payloads). EPS is the power manager, OBDH is the main data handler, TTC is communication module and ADCS is the attitude control system (which is made of magnets and hysteresis bars). The battery and interface board are complements of the integration of our satellite.

    Payloads are modules that are not essential for the normal operation of the satellite. Usually are scientific experiments, cameras and other equipaments that are part of the main objective of the mission. In our mission, we have two payloads, one from UNSW (Australia) that verifies the effects of solar radiation in FPGA and one develop by ourselves in partnership with NanoXplore to test their resistant to radiation FPGA on space.

    The EPS, OBDH, TTC, battery board and interface board were developed by FloripaSat group at UFSC. The antennas, solar panels and structure modules were acquired from ISIS nanosatellite supplier.

    We intend to launch our satellite into space in 2018 and currently we are after funding. The estimated cost of the launch is $70,000 and the cost of our satellite is around $50,000.

    Our mission as a whole is open source, with the documentation made in GitHub Wiki also open source. Check the links in our Documentation page.

  • EPS

    The Electrical Power System has been designed to harvest, store and distribute energy for the FloripaSat-I cubesat mission. The energy harvesting system is based on solar energy conversion through six solar panels attached to the FloripaSat structure.

    The EPS is designed to operate the solar panels at their maximum power point. The harvested solar energy is stored in two lithium-ion batteries connected in series. The energy distribution is done by several integrated DC-DC converters.

    The full EPS system is composed of the solar panels, the EPS PCB, the Batteries PCB and the External Batteries Charger PCB.

    Our mission as a whole is open source, with the documentation made in GitHub Wiki also open source. We also have a doxygen page for the EPS's code. Check the links in our Documentation page.

  • OBDH

    The FloripaSat OBDH (On-Board Data Handling) is one of the 3 boards developed for FloripaSat Cubesat Mission. The OBDH module is responsible to synchronize actions and the data flow between other modules (ie. EPS, Payloads) and the Earth segment.

    It packs the generated data into data frames and transmit back to Earth through TTC module, or stores it on a non-volatile memory, for later retrieval. Commands sent from Earth segment to the cubesat will be received by the TTC module and forwarded to OBDH, which takes the appropriate action or forward them to the responsible module, which allows communication from Earth to specific Payloads.

    Our mission as a whole is open source, with the documentation made in GitHub Wiki also open source. We also have a doxygen page for the OBDH's code. Check the links in our Documentation page.

  • TTC

    The TTC (Telemetry, Tracking and Command) is the communication module of the FloripaSat cubesat. It is responsible to make the communication between the earth (A ground station) and the satellite, and is divided in two sub-modules: Beacon and telemetry.

    The beacon is a independent sub-module who transmits a periodic signal containing an identification data (ID) of the satellite and some basic telemetry data.

    The telemetry sub-module is the main communication device. It has a bidirectional data link to receive telecommands from the earth and transmit all the requested data.

    The telemetry sub-module is controlled by the OBDH module (The OBC of the satellite), and the software for handling with this sub-module is under development in the OBDH repository, and is not documented here.

    Our mission as a whole is open source, with the documentation made in GitHub Wiki also open source. We also have a doxygen page for the TTC's code. Check the links in our Documentation page.

  • Our Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) is a Passive Attitude system, which uses Earth's magnetic field to rotate and stabilize the satellite. The system is composed of one magnet to create a force to align the magnet with the Earth's magnetic field and four hysteresis bars to damp the cube oscillations and stabilize. They are placed in positions to minimize the magnet effect on the bars.

    As a passive magnetic attitude control system is used, it is possible to stabilize only two axis, and so, the cubesat will still rotate around one of its axis, even after stabilized. A neodymium magnet N45 and 4 hysteresis bars of Permanorm 5000 H2 are used, courtesy of Vacuumschmelze, german company. The material of the hysteresis bar is shaped in order to maximize the stabilization, which is the most important part of the attitude control.

    Our mission as a whole is open source, with the documentation made in GitHub Wiki also open source. Check the links in our Documentation page.

  • The Rush payload is a prototype developed by UNSW (Australia). Designed primarily to validate a new approach to reconfiguring single event upsets due to solar radiation in reconfigurable logic circuits. This payload takes as hardware reconfigurable an FPGA because of its ratio between logical density and power consumption.

    Our mission as a whole is open source, with the documentation made in GitHub Wiki also open source. Check the links in our Documentation page.

  • Payload-X

    Satellites are exposed to increased levels of radiation during spaceflight, which can cause temporary or even permanent damage to electronics, structure materials and the spacecraft systems in general. For this reason, some components are designed to be less sensitive to the effects of radiation, in turn increasing their operations lifespan in the space environment. The Payload-X Experiments Packaged has an FPGA especially made to survive this kind of threat. It's called BRAVE, and will be flown for the first time in orbit on board the FloripaSat-I mission. Payload-X is built with high radiation hardness in mind, including a PCB designed specially for the space environment, multiple redundancies, and radiation sensors for data collection and analysis.

    FPGAs are capable of being reconfigured at the hardware level mid-flight, which is of great use during a space mission. It allows for fixing bugs identified during the operations, modifying the processes executed with the same components (especially after the main mission objectives have been accomplished) or even testing new methods not yet developed at the time of launch, all while maintaining the efficiency and speed of embedded systems. Reconfiguration occurs at the bitstream level of the FPGA, meaning it can be easily transmitted from any ground station.

    Inside BRAVE, there is an IP Core responsible for managing telemetry and telecommand packages in the ECSS/CCSDS standard. For the purpose of validation of this component, this FPGA will have a module simulating a flight computer collecting data from sensors and delivering them to the IP Core. All data is sent to a microcontroller in Payload-X, which then directs it to the satellite's main hub to be radioed back to Earth.

    Our mission as a whole is open source, with the documentation made in GitHub Wiki also open source. Check the links in our Documentation page.